“The Dresden Effect”

Originally posted on Monsters and Magic:

electricity

I am a huge fan of the Jim Butcher series, the Dresden Files.  I got hooked on the very first book, Storm Front, and have followed Harry Dresden through his adventures right up to the current book.

What, you may ask, does this have to do with the topics we discuss here?  Well, one of the tell tale signs of a wizard’s presence in Butcher’s world is the failure of electronics around that magic worker.  When Dresden goes to visit friends, they are forced to unplug their computers and power down their cell phones to save those devices from the ill effects of Dresden’s power.

Interestingly, we see much the same effect in real world paranormal phenomenon.  (Perhaps Butcher got the idea from reading up on high strangeness events?)

Probably the best known example of this in the paranormal world is the consistent reports of UFO witnesses that testify…

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Centaur Sightings

mickevery:

Check this out! It is wild =D

Originally posted on Monsters and Magic:

My 06 May blog covered a Beyond the Edge (BTE) Radio appearance by the leaders of Crypto 4 Corners, J C Johnson and Chief Leonard Dan, and the extraordinary variety of reports that this team investigates in their area. To quote myself:

Listening to the podcast, Crypto Four Corners has investigated reports of the Furry Ones (Sasquatch), skinwalkers, giant rabbit-like ‘rodents’, mini T-Rex, ‘Night Stalkers’ (gargoyle like creatures), little people, centaurs, gryphons, winged hominids and dogman/manwolf. I know, from other reports that I have seen elsewhere on the Internet that J C Johnson has also reported a sighting of a dire wolf or something similar while on a San Juan river expedition.

I noted in that blog that I disagreed with Mr. Johnson’s belief that all this high strangeness did not result from a window or portal in his research area. Given the amount of Fortean phenomena reported in that…

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Charm Sticks and Charm Wands: A Little-Noted Item of Folklore

Originally posted on Papers Falling from an Attic Window:

Over a year ago, I was kicking about the back roads of Cornwall for a few days.  Having had to revise my itinerary due to confusion about a car registration, I chose to take the bus out to Zennor to see the famous mermaid bench in its church (here’s the legend that surrounds it).   Not knowing what else to visit in Zennor, which is an incredibly small town, I chose to spent a pleasant hour in the Wayside Museum there, which includes a working mill and other relics of traditional life in Cornwall from various eras.  It was there that I saw the following curious item, hanging on a beam over the hearth in the kitchen display:

Charm stick, Wayside Museum, Zennor

Charm stick, Wayside Museum, Zennor

It’s hard to see from the position, but you can see the crook at one end on the left and follow the shaft over Here are…

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Gospel of the Witches; Pagan Gospel

Excerpt from Wiki

Aradia-title-page.jpg

Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches is a book composed by the American folklorist Charles Godfrey Leland that was published in 1899. It contains what he believed was the religious text of a group of pagan witches in Tuscany, Italy that documented their beliefs and rituals, although various historians and folklorists have disputed the existence of such a group. In the 20th century, the book was very influential in the development of the contemporary Pagan religion of Wicca.

The text is a composite. Some of it is Leland’s translation into English of an original Italian manuscript, the Vangelo (gospel). Leland reported receiving the manuscript from his primary informant on Italian witchcraft beliefs, a woman Leland referred to as “Maddalena” and whom he called his “witch informant” in Italy. The rest of the material comes from Leland’s research on Italian folklore and traditions, including other related material from Maddalena. Leland had been informed of the Vangelos existence in 1886, but it took Maddalena eleven years to provide him with a copy. After translating and editing the material, it took another two years for the book to be published. Its fifteen chapters portray the origins, beliefs, rituals, and spells of an Italian pagan witchcraft tradition. The central figure of that religion is the goddess Aradia, who came to Earth to teach the practice of witchcraft to peasants in order for them to oppose their feudal oppressors and the Roman Catholic Church.

Leland’s work remained obscure until the 1950s, when other theories about, and claims of, “pagan witchcraft” survivals began to be widely discussed. Aradia began to be examined within the wider context of such claims. Scholars are divided, with some dismissing Leland’s assertion regarding the origins of the manuscript, and others arguing for its authenticity as a unique documentation of folk beliefs. Along with increased scholarly attention, Aradia came to play a special role in the history of Gardnerian Wicca and its offshoots, being used as evidence that pagan witchcraft survivals existed in Europe, and because a passage from the book’s first chapter was used as a part of the religion’s liturgy. After the increase in interest in the text, it became widely available through numerous reprints from a variety of publishers, including a 1999 critical edition with a new translation by Mario and Dina Pazzaglini.

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